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Irvington Public Schools are finishing their year of Bike Ed Program in their Elementary Schools

Irvington Public Schools are finishing their year of Bike Ed Program in their Elementary Schools fourth and fifth grade classes.  There are numerous benefits that children attain in learning how to ride a bicycle.

  1. It’s pure and simple fun.

Once your child has a bike, cycling is a fun and free activity that they can enjoy with friends and family for life.

  1. It keeps kids physically active

Encouraging your child to ride a bike while they’re young helps to establish healthy exercise habits that are likely to stay with them for life.

  1. It benefits kids’ mental health and learning

    Learning to glide before riding.

Riding a bike not only improves physical fitness, it also benefits your child’s learning development and mental health. Research shows that students who ride a bike to school are more focused and ready to learn, compared with those who are driven. Taking part in regular physical activity also has links to increase happiness, and their independence.

  1. It’s something the whole family can enjoy together

Cycling is an activity that all ages can enjoy. Moms , dads, kids, and even grandparents can take part in a family bike ride. Remember, the key to family bike rides is to have fun. So, start slowly and take plenty of breaks to give little riders time to rest.

  1. It’s good for the environment

Using active transport like cycling instead of driving reduces carbon emissions, eases traffic congestion and eliminates parking problems. Less pollution and traffic mean our communities will become greener, healthier and less stressful places to live.

  1. It’s a great way to get around

Once your child gets older, riding a bike becomes a quick and healthy way for them to get to and from school, sporting and play activities. Even better, it saves you time because your child won’t have to rely on you for lifts. Now that’s a benefit every parent can relate to!

This program is presented by the New Jersey Association of Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance. We visited the Chancellor Avenue School in Irvington with Lisa Gulla, our Grant Coach in June to see how the program is progressing. To our surprise the school is doing fantastic the Fruit and Veggie grant, Fuel Up and Play 60, along with a many other activities to stimulate and motivate their students. At the beginning of the Bike Ed Program, a survey was taken to see the number of students who rode bike and new non-riders. Approximately, 15% of the fourth and fifth grade students knew how to ride and now in June approximately 80% can ride a bicycle. All the elementary schools in the Irvington have had the bicycles in their schools throughout the year. The teachers have done a marvelous job with this program into their schools. When we asked students how they have enjoyed the program, Malia stated “I have a bike and me and my mom and dad ride in the park.” Both mom and dad are bike riders and make this a family adventure.  Gabrielle, who was a beginner, stated, “I love riding the hills because I enjoy the speed.

Christine Pfeiffer and Dr. Winston Jackson, Principal

We will be continuing this program next year at the Irvington School

. Christine Pfeiffer, a fourth grade Physical Education teacher at Chancellor Avenue Elementary School stated, “Kids who don’t have bikes at home, can have the experience and learn to love to ride a bike in a safe and fun environment. Maybe they will ask for a bike at Christmas.” It is a goal to have a safe environment for our bike riders within Irvington. These students are learning bike safety and the rules of the road to become a safe vehicle on the road. Bikes are a vehicle.

 

 

 

 

About the Grantee

New Jersey Association for Health Physical Education Recreation and Dance (NJAHPERD)

NJAHPERD is dedicated to advancing quality health education, physical education, recreation, dance education, and athletics through professional development, programming, advocacy, and collegial exchange. The Association promotes responsibility and development of healthy active lifestyles for New Jersey’s students, educators and community members.