LIVE - LEARN - WORK - PLAY

Grantee Blog 2020

Active Living

It is important to provide young people opportunities and encouragement to participate in physical activities that are appropriate for their age, that are enjoyable, and that offer variety. According to the US Department of Health and Human Services Physical Activity Guidelines (2018), children and adolescents ages 6 through 17 years should do 60 minutes (1 hour) or more of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity daily. Aerobic: Most of the 60 minutes or more per day should be either moderate- or vigorous-intensity aerobic physical activity and should include vigorous-intensity physical activity on at least 3 days a week. Running, hopping, skipping, jumping rope, swimming, dancing, and bicycling are all examples of aerobic activities. Aerobic activities increase cardiorespiratory fitness.  Muscle-strengthening: As part of their 60 minutes or more of daily physical activity, children and adolescents should include muscle-strengthening physical activity on at least 3 days a week. Muscle-strengthening activities make muscles do more work than usual during activities of daily life. This is called overload, and strengthens the muscles. Muscle-strengthening activities can be unstructured and part of play, such as playing on playground equipment, climbing trees, and playing tug-of-war. Or, they can be structured, such as lifting weights or working with resistance bands. Bone-strengthening: As part of their 60 minutes or more of daily physical activity, children and adolescents should include bone-strengthening physical activity on at least 3 days a week. Bone-strengthening activities produce a force on the bones of the body that promotes bone growth and strength. This force is commonly produced by impact with the ground. Running, jumping rope, basketball, tennis, and hopscotch are all examples of bone-strengthening activities. As these examples illustrate, bone-strengthening activities can also be aerobic and muscle strengthening.

Children and adolescents with disabilities are more likely to be inactive than those without disabilities. Youth with disabilities should work with a health care professional or physical activity specialist to understand the types and amounts of physical activity appropriate for them. When possible, children and adolescents with disabilities should meet the key guidelines. When young people are not able to participate in the appropriate types or amounts of physical activities needed to meet the key guidelines, they should be as active as possible and avoid being inactive.

About the Grantee

Boys & Girls Club of Clifton (BGCClifton)

The Mission of the Boys & Girls Club of Clifton is to inspire and enable young people, especially those who need us most, to realize their full potential as productive, responsible and caring citizens. For over 70 years, the Boys & Girls Club of Clifton has provided targeted programs that help youth achieve academic success, good character and citizenship, and a healthy lifestyle.